Playing your part in the team

Most of us will remember playing some sort of team sport during our Physical Education lessons as school whether this was netball and hockey or football and rugby, team sports are a part of the National Curriculum and so compulsory for children to learn. Alongside these team sports they will also undertake swimming classes, gymnastics and a variety of other track and field events. Sport is popular in the UK and many team sports are played by people on the weekend as a part of their social activities as well as those people who play the sports as a part of a team either in an amateur or a professional capacity.

Here are some of the most popular sporting activities that are played in the UK.

Image Credit

  • Football is probably universally the most popular sport both to play and watch. There are numerous leagues from professional through to amateur and from standard sized teams to five a side clubs. Children can join their local teams with some having feeder clubs into the areas larger teams and even academy set ups. Players regularly train in both football skills and in strength and stamina training to enable them to be in peak athletic shape.

 

  • Rugby is just as popular as football and regularly draws in large crowds both at matches and spectators watching on the television. Similarly, to football children can join a local team and professional teams often have academy places available. Rugby players regularly take part in endurance and stamina training to enable them to improve their game and to help prevent injuries from happening by making sure they are in the best physical shape.

 

Image Credit

  • Cricket is classed as England’s National Game and there are around 18 professional cricket clubs around the country. Some schools are taking the opportunity to teach cricket skills to the pupils from an early age in a bid to give them a range of all options of team sports to learn during PE lessons. Over recent years the number of people watching cricket matches has increased, meaning that popularity for the sport may also be on the rise.